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The Smartphone in Medicine: A Review of Current and Potential Use Among Physicians and Students

The Smartphone in Medicine: A Review of Current and Potential Use Among Physicians and Students

These roles included patient care, medical reference, and continuing education. We also sought uses of the smartphone in medical education, communication, and research.

Errol Ozdalga, Ark Ozdalga, Neera Ahuja

J Med Internet Res 2012;14(5):e128

Effects of a 12-Week Digital Care Program for Chronic Knee Pain on Pain, Mobility, and Surgery Risk: Randomized Controlled Trial

Effects of a 12-Week Digital Care Program for Chronic Knee Pain on Pain, Mobility, and Surgery Risk: Randomized Controlled Trial

Recommended components of effective non-pharmacological care for chronic musculoskeletal pain include physical activity, patient education, weight reduction, and self-management and coping strategies [9,11–13].

Gabriel Mecklenburg, Peter Smittenaar, Jennifer C Erhart-Hledik, Daniel A Perez, Simon Hunter

J Med Internet Res 2018;20(4):e156

Development of an Educational Game to Set Up Surgical Instruments on the Mayo Stand or Back Table: Applied Research in Production Technology

Development of an Educational Game to Set Up Surgical Instruments on the Mayo Stand or Back Table: Applied Research in Production Technology

It is well known that students from different fields of medical science are exposed to several stress factors throughout clinical education processes inside the operating room [9-11].

Crislaine Pires Padilha Paim, Silvia Goldmeier

JMIR Serious Games 2017;5(1):e1

An Epiduroscopy Simulator Based on a Serious Game for Spatial Cognitive Training (EpiduroSIM): User-Centered Design Approach

An Epiduroscopy Simulator Based on a Serious Game for Spatial Cognitive Training (EpiduroSIM): User-Centered Design Approach

Such surgical training has limited training opportunities, and the interaction between surgical instruments and human organs is difficult to train [3].

Junho Ko, Jong Joo Lee, Seong-Wook Jang, Yeomin Yun, Sungchul Kang, Dong Ah Shin, Yoon Sang Kim

JMIR Serious Games 2019;7(3):e12678

An Educational Network for Surgical Education Supported by Gamification Elements: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

An Educational Network for Surgical Education Supported by Gamification Elements: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

All medical students are required to learn these surgical skills during their education, which is a source of anxiety and a challenge for many students.With the traditional method, student learning depends on circumstances and the random presentation of cases

Natasha Guérard-Poirier, Michèle Beniey, Léamarie Meloche-Dumas, Florence Lebel-Guay, Bojana Misheva, Myriam Abbas, Malek Dhane, Myriam Elraheb, Adam Dubrowski, Erica Patocskai

JMIR Res Protoc 2020;9(12):e21273

Evaluation of App-Based Serious Gaming as a Training Method in Teaching Chest Tube Insertion to Medical Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

Evaluation of App-Based Serious Gaming as a Training Method in Teaching Chest Tube Insertion to Medical Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

Additionally, future training methods should aim at providing highest levels of education without endangering patient safety.Serious Games for Teaching Medical StudentsSerious games have become more prevalent in surgical training of physicians and medical students

Patrick Haubruck, Felix Nickel, Julian Ober, Tilman Walker, Christian Bergdolt, Mirco Friedrich, Beat Peter Müller-Stich, Franziska Forchheim, Christian Fischer, Gerhard Schmidmaier, Michael C Tanner

J Med Internet Res 2018;20(5):e195