JMIR Serious Games

A multidisciplinary journal on gaming and gamification including simulation and immersive virtual reality for health education/promotion, teaching, medicine, rehabilitation, and social change

Editor-in-Chief:

Nabil Zary, MD, PhD, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Science, Dubai, UAE


Impact Factor 3.36

JMIR Serious Games (JSG, ISSN 2291-9279; Impact Factor 3.36) is a multidisciplinary journal devoted to computer/web/virtual reality/mobile applications that incorporate elements of gaming, gamification or novel hardware platforms such as virtual reality headsets or Microsoft Kinect to solve serious problems such as health behavior change, physical exercise promotion (exergaming), medical rehabilitation, diagnosis and treatment of psychological/psychiatric disorders, medical education, health promotion, teaching and education, or social change. The journal also considers commentary and research in the fields of video game violence and video game addiction.

In 2022, JSG received a Journal Impact Factor™ of 3.36 (5-Year Journal Impact Factor™ 4.30) (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2022). JMIR Serious Games is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, DOAJ, Scopus, SCIE/Web of Science, and PsycINFO.

Recent Articles

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Serious Games for Health and Medicine

Immersive virtual reality (IVR) has been investigated as a tool for treating psychiatric conditions. In particular, the practical nature of IVR, by offering a doing instead of talking approach, could support people who do not benefit from existing treatments. Hence, people with mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID; IQ=50-85) might profit particularly from IVR therapies, for instance, to circumvent issues in understanding relevant concepts and interrelations. In this context, immersing the user into a virtual body (ie, avatar) appears promising for enhancing learning (eg, by changing perspectives) and usability (eg, natural interactions). However, design requirements, immersion procedures, and proof of concept of such embodiment illusion (ie, substituting the real body with a virtual one) have not been explored in this group.

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Games for Medical Education and Training

Although battlefield first aid (BFA) training shares many common features with civilian training, such as the need to address technical skills and nontechnical skills (NTSs), it is more highly scenario-dependent. Studies into extended reality show clear benefits in medical training; however, the training effects of extended reality on NTSs, including teamwork and decision-making in BFA, have not been fully proven.

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Serious Games for Health and Medicine

With more than 1.4 billion adults worldwide classified as physically inactive, physical inactivity is a public health crisis leading to an increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases. Motivating and engaging training strategies are needed to tackle this public health crisis. Studies have shown that exergames, games controlled by active body movements, are potentially usable, attractive, and effective tools for home-based training. The ExerCube (by Sphery Ltd) has been developed as a physically immersive and adaptive functional fitness game. The development of a home-based version of the ExerCube could increase accessibility, reduce barriers to exercise, and provide an attractive solution to improve physical and cognitive health.

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Serious Games for Health and Medicine

Immersive virtual reality (IVR) can be defined as a fully computer-generated environment shown on a head-mounted display. Existing research suggests that key features of IVR can assist older adults in their everyday lives, providing opportunities for health promotion and tackling social isolation and loneliness. There has been a surge in qualitative studies exploring older adults’ experiences and perceptions of IVR. However, there has been no systematic synthesis of these studies to inform the design of new, more accessible IVR technologies.

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Exergames, Active Games and Gamification of Physical Activity

Many young adults do not reach the World Health Organization’s minimum recommendations for the amount of weekly physical activity. The virtual reality 3D head-mounted display (VR 3D HMD) exergame is a technology that is more immersive than a typical exercise session. Our study considers gender differences in the experience of using VR games for increasing physical activity.

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Serious Games for Health and Medicine

Artificial intelligence (AI)–driven serious games have been used in health care to offer a customizable and immersive experience. Summarizing the features of the current AI-driven serious games is very important to explore how they have been developed and used and their current state to plan on how to leverage them in the current and future health care needs.

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Games for Medical Education and Training

There are limitations to conducting face-to-face classes following the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Web-based education is no longer a temporary form of teaching and learning during unusual events, such as pandemics, but has proven to be necessary to uphold in parallel with offline education in the future. Therefore, it is necessary to scientifically organize the priorities of a learner needs analysis by systematically and rationally investigating and analyzing the needs of learners for the development of virtual reality (VR) programs for core nursing skills (CNS).

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Exergames, Active Games and Gamification of Physical Activity

In recent years, there has been a growing interest in active virtual reality games (AVRGs) that provide entertainment and encourage more physical activity (PA). Since playing AVRGs involves primarily arm movements, the intensity of this form of PA may not be sufficient for health benefits. Therefore, it is worth looking for virtual entertainment solutions that are comfortable for users and at the same time increase physical exercise.

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Serious Games for Health and Medicine

Extreme labor pain has negative effects; pharmacologic analgesic modalities are effective but are accompanied by adverse effects. Virtual reality (VR) works as a distracting nonpharmacologic intervention for pain and anxiety relief; however, the effects of VR use in laboring women is unknown.

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Serious Games for Health and Medicine

The increasing number of children with cerebral palsy (CP) has a serious impact on individuals, families, and society. As a new technology, virtual reality (VR) has been used in the rehabilitation of children with CP.

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Game Addiction and Other Unintended Consequences

Parents play central roles in adolescents’ socialization, behavioral development, and health, including the development of internet gaming disorder (IGD). However, longitudinal research on the parental predictors of adolescent IGD is limited.

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