JMIR Serious Games

A multidisciplinary journal on gaming and gamification including simulation and immersive virtual reality for health education/promotion, teaching, medicine, rehabilitation, and social change

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria (Canada)


Impact Factor 4.0

JMIR Serious Games (JSG, ISSN 2291-9279; Impact Factor 4.0) is a multidisciplinary journal devoted to computer, web, virtual reality, mobile applications, and other emerging technologies that incorporate elements of gaming, gamification or novel hardware platforms such as virtual reality devices or wearables. The journal focuses on the use of this technology to solve serious problems such as health behavior change, physical exercise promotion (exergaming), medical rehabilitation, diagnosis and treatment of psychological/psychiatric disorders, medical education, health promotion, teaching and education (game-based learning), and social change. JSG also invites commentary and research in the fields of video game violence and video game addiction.

While JSG maintains a strong focus on health, the journal also aims to highlight research exploring serious games in health-adjacent and other interdisciplinary contexts, including but not limited to military, education, industry, and workplace applications.

In 2022, JMIR Serious Games received a Journal Impact Factor™ of 4.0 (5-Year Journal Impact Factor™: 4.2) (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023). The journal is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, DOAJ, Scopus, SCIE (Clarivate), and PsycINFO.

Recent Articles

Article Thumbnail
Reviews

The increasing prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has driven research interest on the therapy of individuals with autism, especially children, as early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can lead to improvement in the condition. With the widespread availability of virtual reality, augmented reality (AR), and mixed reality technologies to the public and the increasing popularity of mobile devices, the interest in the use of applications and technologies to provide support for the therapy of children with autism is growing.

|
Article Thumbnail
Serious Games for Health and Medicine

Adolescence is a crucial phase for early intervention and prevention of mental health problems. Casual video games are popular and have promise as a novel mechanism for reaching young people, but this potential has seldom been explored.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews

Several electronic interventions have been used to improve glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Electronic interactive games specific to physical activity are available, but it is unclear if these are effective at improving glycemic control in patients with diabetes.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews

Serious games have emerged as an innovative educational strategy with the potential to significantly enhance the quality and effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training. Despite their promise, there remains a degree of controversy when comparing the advantages of serious games with traditional CPR training methods. This study seeks to provide a comprehensive assessment of the impact of serious games on CPR training and education by systematically analyzing the results of previous research.

|
Article Thumbnail
Serious Games for Education

The process of constructing knowledge in the context of children's science education plays a significant role in fostering the development of early scientific literacy. Nevertheless, children sometimes struggle to comprehend scientific knowledge due to the presence of abstract notions.

|
Article Thumbnail
Research Letter

This research letter presents the co-design process for RG4Face, a mime therapy–based serious game that uses computer vision for human facial movement recognition and estimation to help health care professionals and patients in the facial rehabilitation process.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews

Artificial intelligence (AI) and game-based methods such as serious games or gamification are both emerging technologies and methodologies in health care. The merging of the two could provide greater advantages, particularly in the field of therapeutic interventions in medicine.

|
Article Thumbnail
Games for Rehabilitation

Since the early 2000s, there has been a growing interest in using exercise video games (exergames) and virtual reality (VR)–based interventions as innovative methods to enhance physical rehabilitation for individuals with multiple disabilities. Over the past decade, researchers and exercise professionals have focused on developing specialized immersive exercise video games for various populations, including those who have experienced a stroke, revealing tangible benefits for upper limb rehabilitation. However, it is necessary to develop highly engaging, personalized games that can facilitate the creation of experiences aligned with the preferences, motivations, and challenges communicated by people who have had an episode of stroke.

|
Article Thumbnail
Serious Games for Health and Medicine

Rhythm perception and production are related to phonological awareness and reading performance, and rhythmic deficits have been reported in dyslexia. In addition, rhythm-based interventions can improve cognitive function, and there is consistent evidence suggesting that they are an efficient tool for training reading skills in dyslexia.

|
Article Thumbnail
Serious Games for Health and Medicine

The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged the mental health of health care workers, increasing the rates of stress, moral distress (MD), and moral injury (MI). Virtual reality (VR) is a useful tool for studying MD and MI because it can effectively elicit psychophysiological responses, is customizable, and permits the controlled study of participants in real time.

|
Article Thumbnail
Exergames, Active Games and Gamification of Physical Activity

New interventions based on motor learning principles and neural plasticity have been tested with patients with ataxia and hemiparesis. Therapies of pedalling exercises also have shown their potential to induce improvements in muscle activity, strength, and balance. Virtual reality (VR) has been demonstrated as an effective tool for improving the adherence to physical therapy, but it is still undetermined if it promotes greater improvements than conventional therapy

|

We are working in partnership with